A little bit more about “Circassia”

It’s been a while since my last post, that is particularly due to studies that I’ve been involved with during the past 9 months or so, :p

Tonight I want to publish some more information about “Circassia” that may become beneficial for someone.

So, Circassia is part of the Caucasus (i.e. North Caucasus) as shown below, nowadays Circassia lies at the southern part of Russia, although not much efforts are being done to spread this information, Circassia (which is the original and historical homeland for Circassians) is politically divided into 3 major republics from east to west (Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay-Cherkessk, Republic of Adygea)

now that is it for now, just warming up for next posts ..

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Circassians and Circassia

The Circassians are a North Caucasian ethnic group[19] native to Circassia, who were displaced in the course of the Russian conquest of the Caucasus in the 19th century, especially after the Russian–Circassian War in 1864. The term “Circassian” includes the Adyghe (Circassian: Адыгэ, Adyge) and Kabardian people.[20]

The Circassians mainly speak the Circassian language, a Northwest Caucasian language with numerous dialects. The Circassians also speak Turkish and Arabic in large numbers and various other languages of the Middle East, having been exiled by Russia to lands of the Ottoman Empire, where the majority of them today live, and to a lesser extent neighboring Persia, where most of them came either deported en masse by the Safavids and Qajars, or to a lesser extent as muhajirs in the 19th century like in Ottoman Turkey.[21][22][23][24][25] The predominant religion amongst Circassians is Sunni Islam, Minority Habze, Orthodox Christian and Catholic.

There remain about 700,000 Circassians in historical Circassia (the republics of Adygea, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay-Cherkessia, and the southern half of Krasnodar Krai), as well as a number in the Russian Federation outside these republics. The 2010 Russian Census recorded 718,727 Circassians, of which 516,826 are Kabardians, 124,835 are Adyghe proper, 73,184 are Cherkess and 3,882 Shapsugs.[6]

The Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization estimates that there are as many as 3.7 million “ethnic Circassians” in the diaspora outside the Circassian republics (meaning that only one in seven “ethnic Circassians” lives in the homeland), of whom about 2 million live in Turkey, 700,000 in the Russian Federation, about 150,000 in the Levant and Mesopotamia, and about 50,000 in Europe and the United States.

Circassians

The World’s Youngest Hyperpolyglot

Illustration by Dawn Kim/TED | ideas.ted.com

I always thought that watching the media is an absolute method to understand what is going on in other lands and countries, but after I’d taken my way to Russia to complete my studies I had firstly needed to learn Russian the thing that was expected, but while I was in the process of learning and gaining more vocabularies I’ve found myself in a position where I could easily understand what “REALLY IS GOING ON” I got to understand the culture, their ideas, their thoughts and the most interesting their jokes 😀
I can react when someone Russian get angry or sad, I could feel and support them better, I’m not specializing just the Russian language, but I’m trying to pass my experience to others! after a while, I started to feel since I know 4 languages, which is normal to many people , that some words are meant to be spoken exclusively in Russian like the word “уже” for instance and the word “хотя бы”, at the same time, a lot of words are meant to be spoken in English such as “non-sense”, plus speaking other words in a language but Arabic would be a sin (metaphorically) as “لا تقولا”, not to forget my mother tongue, Circassian or as we call it “Адыгэбзэ” – “Бзэ зымIэр лъэпкъ йIэп”

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